lonequixote:

Venus ~ Claudio Bravo  /  San Antonio Museum of Art
In the 1960’s, Claudio Bravo became a popular society portrait painter, and his hyperrealist portraits were highly sought by rich and famous. His virtuosity and photo-realistic paintings, often depicting draped cloth and paper-wrapped packages, demonstrate influence of the Spanish Baroque masters, such as Francisco de Zubaran (1598 -1664). Bravo’s paintingsand drawings are in the most important museum collections of the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. In 1994, the National Museum of of Fine Arts in Santiago mounted a large retrospective of his work.
Venus represents Bravo at his best. Here, he expertly captures the female form in full bloom and thoroughly captures the attention and imagination of the viewer. Bravo’s successful treatment of drapery is characteristic of his skill in the use of trompe-l’oeil technique.
(source: SAMA)

lonequixote:

Venus ~ Claudio Bravo  /  San Antonio Museum of Art

In the 1960’s, Claudio Bravo became a popular society portrait painter, and his hyperrealist portraits were highly sought by rich and famous. His virtuosity and photo-realistic paintings, often depicting draped cloth and paper-wrapped packages, demonstrate influence of the Spanish Baroque masters, such as Francisco de Zubaran (1598 -1664). Bravo’s paintingsand drawings are in the most important museum collections of the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. In 1994, the National Museum of of Fine Arts in Santiago mounted a large retrospective of his work.

Venus represents Bravo at his best. Here, he expertly captures the female form in full bloom and thoroughly captures the attention and imagination of the viewer. Bravo’s successful treatment of drapery is characteristic of his skill in the use of trompe-l’oeil technique.

(source: SAMA)

Reblogged from lonequixote